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AINSLEY SHEA


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Facts of the Day

Though many people label tablet computers as “mobile” devices, how they are used today tells a different story. One indication that tablets aren’t that mobile (beyond the home) is when they are being used. Another is how many are being connected to mobile networks.

  • In 2011, over 60% of Apple’s first-wave iPad 2’s were thought to be 3G models. (source)
  • In 2011, eBay sales figures showed 61% of iPad 2’s sold were WiFi only models. (source)
  • A year later, 9 out of 10 tablets sold in the United States were WiFi models. (source)
  • 90% of the tablets in the United States use WiFi to get online though some have inactivated cellular chipsets. (source)
  • Only 6% of iPad sessions are via a cellular network. (source)
  • 8.8% of iPads are 3G enabled but 55% of their sessions were on WiFi and 45% on 3G. (source)
  • 1.5% of iPads are 4G enabled but 64% of their sessions were on WiFi and 36% on 3G. (source)

Note: I realize cellular network connections are only one measure of “mobility”. The other set of data I reference above highlights when tablets are being used and shines some additional light on the situation. In additional studies tablet owners said 30% of their time spent with their device was while watching TV and 21% lying in bed.

Warren Claflin, via Lukew.com.

2 years ago
0 notes
thenewrepublic:

Amid a struggling economic recovery comes more dampening news. More people in America fell below the poverty line last year, according to new data released by the Census Bureau on Tuesday. 
According to the report, the number of Americans currently in poverty jumped to 15.1 percent in 2010, a 17 year high, reports the Washington Post. That’s 46.2 million people in poverty, or 1 in 6 Americans. According to the Post, the total number of people living in poverty — defined in 2010 as at or  below an income of $22,314 for a family of four — is now at the highest  level in the 52 years the statistic has been collected. An additional 2.6 million people fell below the poverty line last year, reports the New York Times.
The figure is reported to be up from 43.6 million, or 14.3 percent of the population in 2009. This is the highest poverty level experienced in the United States since 1993. The ranks of the uninsured grew significantly in the past year as well. 
The number of uninsured Americans grew steadily to 49.9 million, also a new all-time high after recent revisions to 2009 figures. The majority of losses in insurance coverage this year were due to working-age Americans who lost employer-provided insurance coverage.
All of this news, while not unexpected, is hot on the heels of a report recently released by the International Diabetes Federation showing that 368 million people worldwide currently suffer from Diabetes, a number so grim that it is drawing worldwide attention.
The disease kills every seven seconds, according to Bloomberg, a figure surely devastating to the overwhelmingly disproportionate number of uninsured afflicted by the disease.
Courtesy of CNNMoney

thenewrepublic:

Amid a struggling economic recovery comes more dampening news. More people in America fell below the poverty line last year, according to new data released by the Census Bureau on Tuesday. 

According to the report, the number of Americans currently in poverty jumped to 15.1 percent in 2010, a 17 year high, reports the Washington Post. That’s 46.2 million people in poverty, or 1 in 6 Americans. According to the Post, the total number of people living in poverty — defined in 2010 as at or below an income of $22,314 for a family of four — is now at the highest level in the 52 years the statistic has been collected. An additional 2.6 million people fell below the poverty line last year, reports the New York Times.

The figure is reported to be up from 43.6 million, or 14.3 percent of the population in 2009. This is the highest poverty level experienced in the United States since 1993. The ranks of the uninsured grew significantly in the past year as well.

The number of uninsured Americans grew steadily to 49.9 million, also a new all-time high after recent revisions to 2009 figures. The majority of losses in insurance coverage this year were due to working-age Americans who lost employer-provided insurance coverage.

All of this news, while not unexpected, is hot on the heels of a report recently released by the International Diabetes Federation showing that 368 million people worldwide currently suffer from Diabetes, a number so grim that it is drawing worldwide attention.

The disease kills every seven seconds, according to Bloomberg, a figure surely devastating to the overwhelmingly disproportionate number of uninsured afflicted by the disease.

Courtesy of CNNMoney

3 years ago
216 notes