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National Popular Vote at Half Way Point as Electoral College Meets

LOS ALTOS, CA- As presidential electors in all 50 states meet today to officially elect Barack Obama the President of the United States, the National Popular Vote bill has nearly reached the half way point to guarantee that the Electoral College in the future will reflect the national popular vote choice of the American people.

“As National Popular Vote continues to gain momentum across the country, I am more hopeful than ever that 2012 will be the last presidential election where four out of five American voters in 40 ‘spectator’ states sit on the political sidelines,” said Dr. John Koza, president of National Popular Vote.

Eight states (Hawaii, Washington, California, Illinois, Vermont, Maryland, Massachusetts and New Jersey, plus Washington, D.C.), with a total of 132 combined electoral votes – about half way to the required 270 for the agreement to take effect – have passed the National Popular Vote bill.

“The problem with the current system is not the Electoral College itself,” Koza continued. “The real problem is the state-by-state, winner-take-all rules that have led presidential candidates and their campaigns to focus solely on a shrinking number of swing states, at the expense of the rest of us. The Constitution gives legislatures the exclusive power to fix the broken system and National Popular Vote is the right reform to make every voter matter and guarantee the presidency to the candidate who wins the national popular vote.”

Dr. Koza noted that during the 2012 presidential election, President Obama campaigned in only eight states after being nominated by his party, and Governor Romney campaigned in just 10 states. The other 40 states had zero events. A total of $939,370,708 in post-convention advertising was concentrated in just 12 states.

With state and national polls consistently showing some 75% of Americans supporting the change, Koza said we, “can hopefully look forward to a 2016 presidential election in which candidates will be compelled to campaign for every single vote across all 50 states. Every voter in each state should be equally important.”

About National Popular Vote

National Popular Vote is a 501(c)4 political organization advancing the National Popular Vote bill. In addition to passing in eight states and the District of Columbia, the bill has been introduced in all 50 states and has passed 31 legislative chambers. For more information, visit www.nationalpopularvote.com.

1 year ago
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Ad Targeting by Voter Registration

New political ad targeting is now available to campaigns. The typo (abount Undertone) doesn’t inspire confidence, but this is an area of marketing that needs to join the 21st century. Hopefully this will lead to similar offerings down the road.

"Undertone, which creates digital advertising solutions for brands, today announced the launch of new political targeting capabilities that enable advertisers to target audiences based on voter registration across quality-guaranteed websites.
The new capabilities are built on a partnership with Audience Partners, the market leader in powering data-driven targeting solutions for political candidates, advocacy groups and causes. Undertone’s new political targeting solution enables advertisers to target voters and constituents by a range of criteria including self-reported registered party, voting frequency, gender, age, income and location. All data used is verified by voter registration and in compliance with Undertone’s privacy policy and industry self-regulatory compliance.”

Read the full press release here.

Post by Kevin Sawyer.

2 years ago
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The case for a national popular vote

With all eyes trained on Iowa and New Hampshire as their decisive presidential nominating contests approach, the question once again is upon us: Why should these two states have such disproportionate sway over American politics? This is a particularly pressing question right now because our increasingly multiethnic, urbanized nation looks less and less like these two small, super-white, largely rural, comparatively older enclaves. In effect, the system promotes a form of generational tyranny whereby a disappearing mid-20th-century model of America continues to wield disproportionate power over today’s 21st century America.

Read the full article at Salon.com

2 years ago
9 notes
And the economic isolationists think trade wars are the answer. The light blue containers are headed for China. (This picture was taken behind our office in St. Paul) via Pat Rosenstiel.

And the economic isolationists think trade wars are the answer. The light blue containers are headed for China. (This picture was taken behind our office in St. Paul) via Pat Rosenstiel.

3 years ago
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newsweek:

In the oversaturated media culture, the most influential political figures are generally the ones who make the most money peddling their perspectives. NEWSWEEK asked Wealth-X, an intelligence and research firm, to compile a list of the 50 highest-earning political figures of 2010. From politicians to media personalities to the former editor of Newsweek (who disputed Wealth-X’s findings), a look at the folks who hawk their personal brands in the public marketplace—and influence American political discourse in the process.

newsweek:

In the oversaturated media culture, the most influential political figures are generally the ones who make the most money peddling their perspectives. NEWSWEEK asked Wealth-X, an intelligence and research firm, to compile a list of the 50 highest-earning political figures of 2010. From politicians to media personalities to the former editor of Newsweek (who disputed Wealth-X’s findings), a look at the folks who hawk their personal brands in the public marketplace—and influence American political discourse in the process.

3 years ago
19 notes
The 20 Most Influential Americans of All Time

The trailblazers, visionaries and cultural ambassadors who defined a nation. (Listed chronologically)

See who made the list at Time.com
1 year ago
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thenewrepublic:

Is there a reason to be optimistic about the economy again?
“Once again, today’s biggest political news isn’t about the Republican  candidates or the President, even though the former are battling in  Florida and the latter is about to give the State of the Union address.  It’s the latest Gallup survey,  which shows economic confidence has risen sharply since August and is  now at levels not seen since May. That report is consistent with the  latest ABC News/Washington Post poll, in which confidence in the economy reaches its highest rate in months.”
— Johnathan Cohn, “Biggest Political News of the Day”

thenewrepublic:

Is there a reason to be optimistic about the economy again?

“Once again, today’s biggest political news isn’t about the Republican candidates or the President, even though the former are battling in Florida and the latter is about to give the State of the Union address. It’s the latest Gallup survey, which shows economic confidence has risen sharply since August and is now at levels not seen since May. That report is consistent with the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll, in which confidence in the economy reaches its highest rate in months.”

— Johnathan Cohn, “Biggest Political News of the Day

2 years ago
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Legislators Adopting Social Media

The Congressional Management Foundation’s (CMF) has released a new report— #SocialCongress: Perceptions and Use of Social Media on Capitol Hill—a survey of congressional staffers’ attitudes about their offices’ use of social media.

The major findings are summarized below and the details in the report are interesting to read.

• Congressional offices are using social media to help gauge public opinion, augmenting traditional tools used for that purpose.
• Congressional offices now include social media among the tools used to communicate Senators’ and Representatives’ views and activities.
• Younger staffers see more value in social media than their older colleagues.
• Staffers from offices that embrace technology are more likely to see media as a benefit to the office and to believe the Internet has improved the dialogue between citizens and Congress.
• Social media managers have a more positive view of constituent communications than senior managers or staffers who are primarily tasked with answering the mail.
• Many staffers—especially in Democratic offices—feel their office spends too little time on online communications.

Read more here.

2 years ago
53 notes