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AINSLEY SHEA


This blog is about all the great ways we engage: to serve our clients, to make ourselves better, to make our clients better. Read, enjoy, and by all means, engage us. Let's get better together.

E-mail: contact@ainsleyshea.com
The 140 Best Twitter Feeds of 2013

Every year, TIME recognizes those who exemplify the very best wit and wisdom Twitter has to offer.

1 year ago
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Benedict XVI launches a new, more personalized evangelism campaign with a blessing, then answered digital question on faith and prayer. Via USA Today.

Benedict XVI launches a new, more personalized evangelism campaign with a blessing, then answered digital question on faith and prayer. Via USA Today.

1 year ago
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Twitter vs. Weibo: How the World’s Leading Microblog Platforms Stack Up. Via Advertising Age

Twitter vs. Weibo: How the World’s Leading Microblog Platforms Stack Up. Via Advertising Age

1 year ago
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What we are reading: Twitter trends of 2011
Twitter by the numbers

Twitter by the numbers

2 years ago
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What we are testing this week

Hipmunk - We travel a lot for business and searching for flights is always a nightmare. So we were excited to learn about Hipmunk, a new Web site that re-imagines flight search, translating the information you’re most interested in to a user-friendly chart. Very nice.

Bettween- is a Twitter-based application that allows you to track any conversation between two different users from Twitter. For example: want to know what Loic Le Meur, the creator of Seesmic and Robert Scoble, the tech evangelist are talking about? Bettween has the answer(s). You can then embed the conversation in your website.

3 years ago
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Jeep, BK Hacks Shine Light on Twitter’s Treatment of Marketers

Two days, two major brands’ Twitter accounts hacked. Does Twitter provide enough security and service to the brands who rely on it to communicate with millions of consumers?

Twitter began as a platform for people to send short, mass messages, and as brands began to uncover its usefulness, they, too, jumped in. Today Twitter essentially treats as equals brands with millions of followers and people with only a handful, offering one standard account type to serve both. But events over the past two weeks, including the hacking of a pair of brand accounts, Jeep and Burger King, point to the need for a distinction.

Take, for instance, security. Should Twitter have more enterprise-level security for its brand accounts, which are increasingly how marketers communicate with millions of fans? Right now, the same level of security that applies to a regular Twitter user also applies to a brand with millions of followers. Over the past two days Twitter kept silent on the issue of security, other than to tweet “a friendly reminder about password security” from the @TwitterAds account, with a link to a blog post that leads with a tip about using strong passwords.

Twitter declined to comment on the hacks, citing the privacy of individual accounts. But Gizmodo has made a speculative ID of the hacker based on the content of his tweets and posits that the Burger King account was breached by resetting a password via a compromised email account.

It’s unclear whether lax password-security practices by the brands were a factor, but it seems unlikely in light of the vigilance most big brands practice where community management is concerned. Matt Wurst, 360i’s director of digital communities, suggests between five and 10 people total normally have the password for a major marketer’s Twitter account at any given time, in his agency’s experience.

At a minimum, there have been calls for Twitter to implement two-factor authentication, which Facebook has offered since April 2011. Google and Dropbox also use that tactic to improve security for users. On Facebook, this requires a user to verify his or her identity by responding to a text in order to access a Facebook account from a new device.

Twitter has hinted that it will implement the same security provision, even posting a job listing for a software engineer to focus on product security and work on features like “multifactor authentication.” But it’s given no explicit timetable for when the rollout can be expected.

"They’ve been oddly silent about this, and I think they can’t be for long," said Ian Schafer, CEO of Deep Focus. “Two-step authentication is long overdue. Other companies, including their competition, have it.”

While much of the past two days’ focus has been on account security, there’s other evidence that Twitter may need to create special services and accommodations for its brand users. Take, for instance, the experience of Coca-Cola during the Super Bowl. The marketer could not tweet from its handle for almost two hours because it had exceeded the limit of 1,000 daily tweets allowed by Twitter, a measure that’s largely in place to curb spam.

Upside of hacked
The potential to be hacked is the social-media bogeyman that haunts many brands, but the week’s hacks unveiled a potential upside: an infusion of new followers that neither brand had to spend money to attract. Burger King grew its follower count from 83,000 to 110,000 inside of an hour. Tweeted the brand Monday night when it was back in the driver’s seat: “Interesting day here at BURGER KING, but we’re back! Welcome to our new followers. Hope you all stick around!”

Other brands tried to horn in the act. MTV was widely derided for trying to insert itself into the fracas after the network faked a hack modeled after the other two, replacing its logo with BET’s, before tweeting that it was all a joke. And Denny’s posted a mocking tweet: “OMG we hacked ourselves because it’s the cool thing to do!”

Social-media agency M80’s president, Jeff Semones, lauded Burger King’s example and said it proves that some positive can be derived from an account hack, depending on how the aftermath is handled.

"It’s the way we respond as marketers that determines whether we earn respect or get dinged," he said.

Source: Ad Age

1 year ago
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2012 Year on Twitter

Obama, Bieber top 2012’s “Year on Twitter”

1 year ago
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The $1.3 Trillion Price Of Not Tweeting At Work

On June 6, Larry Ellison—CEO of Oracle, one of the largest and most advanced computer technology corporations in the world—tweeted for the very first time. In doing so, he joined a club that remains surprisingly elite. Among CEOs of the world’s Fortune 500 companies, a mere 20 have Twitter accounts. Ellison, by the way, hasn’t tweeted since.

As social media spreads around the globe, one enclave has proven stubbornly resistant: the boardroom. Within the C-suite, perceptions remain that social media is at best a soft PR tool and at worst a time sink for already distracted employees. Without a push from the top, many of the biggest companies have been slow to take the social media plunge.

A new report from McKinsey Global Institute, however, makes the business case for social media a little easier to sell. According to an analysis of 4,200 companies by the business consulting giant, social technologies stand to unlock from $900 billion to $1.3 trillion in value. At the high end, that approaches Australia’s annual GDP. How’s that for a bottom line?

Savings comes from some unexpected places. Two-thirds of the value unlocked by social media rests in “improved communications and collaboration within and across enterprises,” according to the report. Far from a distraction, in other words, social media proves a surprising boon to productivity.

Companies are embracing social tools—including internal networks, wikis, and real-time chat—for functions that go way beyond marketing and community building. R&D teams brainstorm products, HR vets applicants, sales fosters leads, and operations and distribution forecasts and monitors supply chains.

Behind this laundry list is a more hefty benefit. Social technologies have the potential to free up expertise trapped in departmental silos. High-skill workers can now be tapped company-wide. Managers can find out “which employees have the deepest knowledge in certain subjects, or who last contributed to a project and how to get in touch with them quickly,” says New York Times tech reporter Quentin Hardy. Just cutting email out of the picture in favor of social sharing translates to a productivity windfall as “more enterprise information becomes accessible and searchable, rather than locked up as ‘dark matter’ in inboxes.”

Among the most promising (and heretofore least hyped) new social technologies are tools like Yammer (recently snapped up by Microsoft for $1.2 billion), which bring Facebook-like functionality into the office. Social-savvy employees post queries and comments to internal conversation threads and coworkers offer feedback, crowdsourcing solutions. Content can be shared and searched, so the same issues don’t resurface. Meanwhile, virtual groups offer a more interactive alternative than email or phones.

Interestingly, the report suggest that tools like Yammer are the tip of the iceberg. Right now, only five percent of all communications and content use in the U.S. happens on social networks, mainly in the form of content sharing and online socializing. But McKinsey analysts point out that almost any human interaction in the workplace can be “socialized”—endowed with the speed, scale, and disruptive economics of the Internet.

It seems noteworthy that the report’s conclusions have been echoed of late from the most authoritative of places: Wall Street. In the last year, the world’s largest enterprise software companies—Google, Microsoft, Salesforce, Adobe, and even Ellison’s own Oracle—have spent upward of $2.5 billion snatching up social media tools to add to their enterprise suites. Even Twitter-phobic CEOs may have a hard time ignoring that business case.

Via Fast Company

1 year ago
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tweetcongress.org

A very useful database of Congress members who are using Twitter.

2 years ago
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The birth of a trend, from a disaster.

In the midst of a catastrophe most of us can’t even get our heads around, the people closest to it have found their way to communicate and offer support through Twitter. 

The latest rally came when the people of Japan, over the weekend, sent messages begging the nation’s spokesman Yukio Edano thanking him, but urging him to get some rest.  He’d been plowing through the multiple crises - from thousands of unaccounted people, to nuclear meltdowns - for 3 solid days, on no sleep.  The plea got so vocal that today, the hashtag #edano_nero became a global trending topic on Twitter.  The word “nero” means “to sleep” in Japanese. 

The use of micro-blogging is certainly more prevalent in the wake of the Tsunami in Japan than in Haiti, simply because of access and socioeconomics.  Upwards of 13 percent of internet users in Japan use Twitter.  Strangely enough, only 2 percent of online users in Japan use Facebook (compared to 60% in the U.S.).  Something to do with Japanese culture of privacy, not wanting to post identities and photos all over the place to be accessed by virtually anyone.  But Twitter is a different animal.  It has a layer of anonymity. It’s simple, it’s fast.  Haiti was actually the first real (and measurable) use case of Twitter and SMS used as a philanthropic tool.  No natural disaster had served to previously so mobilize the global population - and easily engage financial contributions, open communication and volunteerism.  That same notion of ePhilanthropy has kicked in with Japan as well.  It’s fascinating to watch - and gratifying to participate in. 

How to dontate:

In US, you can text REDCROSS to 90999 to give $10 for Japan earthquake and Pacific Tsunami.

To donate online visit american.redcross.org

Follow American Red Cross on Twitter here.

Post by Annamarie Saarinen.

3 years ago
1 note